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Rationalization vs. Justification

Photographer Jim Osterhout capturing the magic of Peyto Lake in Banff National Park (Daryl L. Hunter/© Daryl L. Hunter)

Photographer Jim Osterhout capturing the magic of Peyto Lake in Banff National Park

Photographer Jim Osterhout shooting it out at John Ford Point in Monument Valley Arizona. (Daryl L. Hunter)

Photographer Jim Osterhout shooting it out at John Ford Point in Monument Valley Arizona.

My friend Jim finally got the full frame sensor camera yesterday that I have been urging him to get for a year. Now Jim is a lot smarter and successful than I am, so despite my advanced age, I try to learn from Jim, but sometimes it’s troubling.

While celebrating his graduation from 24 megapixels to 36 megapixels I extolled how it would change his game, all the while chiding him for waiting so long to pull the trigger on a purchase I knew and he knew, he would eventually make.

Jim reasonably argued he had to “justify” the purchase before buying a multiple thousand-dollar tool. I argued; Why waste a year of usage of a valuable tool you know you will eventually buy anyway, when “rationalization” is nearly as good as “justification” and can be acted on quicker?

Over the past year I have seen Jim make a dozen photo sales which could have facilitated a perfectly “rationalized” purchase justifiably; hence, “rationalization” and “justification” aren’t very far apart.

Jim has been a successful marketer of large and profitable photographic prints for several years now and certainly had plenty of ammunition for “rationalization”. Yes we have wives. Wives prod us for “justification” so yes “justification’” is a valid point for continuity of achievement of wedded bliss. But here is where the “Art” of “rationalization” shines.

McGown Peak Photographer. This majestic peak towers over Stanley Lake in the Sawtooth National Forest. (Daryl L. Hunter/© Daryl L. Hunter)

McGown Peak Photographer Jim Osterhout. This majestic peak towers over Stanley Lake in the Sawtooth National Forest.

Can something as irrational as rationalization be an art? The definition of art has evolved over time and varies based on context. The nature of art has been described by philosopher Richard Wollheim as “one of the most elusive of the traditional problems of human culture.” Art has been defined as a vehicle for the expression or communication of emotions and ideas. Ah ha, anything can in fact be art! We as visual artists sometimes must spread our wings and embrace the art of rationalization.

There is a price to pay for the starving artist whose art of “rationalization” is more prolific than his art of photography. Jim and his smiling wife live in a beautiful home on the river, and I live in an artist’s hovel, neither on the river, nor with the mountain view from the mountain above. My frowning wife also lives in an artist’s hovel, neither on the river, nor with the mountain view from the mountain above.

I though have had a full frame camera since 2008 🙂

Jim Osterhout capturing the beauty of the west side of the Grand Tetons from Grand Targhee Mountain Resort (Daryl L. Hunter/© Daryl L. Hunter)

Jim Osterhout capturing the beauty of the west side of the Grand Tetons from Grand Targhee Mountain Resort

 

2 thoughts on “Rationalization vs. Justification

  1. GREG BALVIN says:

    Well written my friend

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