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Posts Tagged ‘Bison’

Eagerly anticipating a great day of wildlife photography, upon cresting the hill at Golden Gate just past Rustic Falls, to my surprise I saw three tepees pitched east of the road along Glen Creek. As I surveyed the scene for photo opps I noticed up ahead, crossing the road, a band of Indians, horseback, in buckskins, packing quivers of arrows and carrying spears.

A photographer that has read about wildlife behavior will have learned the behavioral signs of when an animal is getting irritated. When a bison is mad we will lift his tail, moose and elk will lay their ears back like a horse and start pawing the ground just to name a few. It is important to learn these things before approaching animals.

Bison are the largest mammals in Yellowstone National Park. They are grazers of grasslands, meadows, foothills, and even the high-elevation, forested plateaus of Yellowstone. They are uniquely suited for survival in the deep snows of Yellowstone’s winter, their giant head works as a snow plow as they move it back and fourth to clear a place to browse.

The sow and four cubs awoke a half hour after my return and they put on a good show for about a half an hour 100 yards from the road then they disappeared into the trees. Our extended wait for the next appearance of the cubs came during a downpour of frozen snowballs that came at us sideways but very few of the dozens of us assembled where about to leave.

Copyright © 2012 All Rights Reserved by Daryl L. Hunter ~ written for and originally published in The Greater Yellowstone Resource Guide “Locking Horns – Bison Demonstrating Metaphors” I look at this picture and I see a metaphor, a metaphor that is emblematic of my life. I have been locking horns with people ever since my age of […]

Yellowstone’s abundant and diverse wildlife are as famous as its geysers. After the reintroduction of the wolf all of the wildlife species that inhabited the park when it was first explored over 100 years ago survive today qualifying Yellowstone as the only intact eco-system in the lower 48 states.