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Posts Tagged ‘Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem’

Eagerly anticipating a great day of wildlife photography, upon cresting the hill at Golden Gate just past Rustic Falls, to my surprise I saw three tepees pitched east of the road along Glen Creek. As I surveyed the scene for photo opps I noticed up ahead, crossing the road, a band of Indians, horseback, in buckskins, packing quivers of arrows and carrying spears.

Perhaps more than any other member of the animal kingdom, wolves have historically played the villain’s role.

A year of video and stills compressed into YouTube’s fifteen-minute format. It was a great year of bears, wolves, elk and such. The video starts at the beginning of the year and takes you through to the end. Since it was too long I had to remove all of the Grizzly 399 and 310 footage as well as other wildlife dramas but they can be found elsewhere here on the blog.

If the grizzly and wolf are the iconic heart of Greater Yellowstone’s wilderness, I believe Yellowstone’s elk are the soul. The majestic bulls of fall bugling, struting, and fighting for harems of cows surely is one of the greatest shows in nature.

Bison are the largest mammals in Yellowstone National Park. They are grazers of grasslands, meadows, foothills, and even the high-elevation, forested plateaus of Yellowstone. They are uniquely suited for survival in the deep snows of Yellowstone’s winter, their giant head works as a snow plow as they move it back and fourth to clear a place to browse.

The most common here is the Great Horned Owl which is one of the most widespread owls in North America. Great Grey Owls frequent the area and may be found in the boreal forest. Great Gray Owl feeds on small rodents like mice and squirrels.

Yellowstone is more than just our most famous national park it is greater than that. The Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) is the last large, nearly intact ecosystem in the northern temperate zone of the Earth and is only partially located within Yellowstone National Park.