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Posts Tagged ‘photography’

The antiquity of Venice was and interesting stop on our way to Cortina d’Ampezzo. The hour and a half drive from Venice to Auronzo di Cadore increased in beauty as we climbed in elevation; a photographer’s reoccurring, deja vu, I was seeing places I wish I had the time to stop at.

I grew up twelve miles from the southern terminus of what can be construed as the Big Sur Coast. My grandmother used to paint seascapes here, and I’m reasonably sure my mother emptied Lime Kiln Creek of landscape rock.

Pitigliano, Photography, travel, Italy, tuscany, fortified city, fortress, Etruscan, Little Jerusalem, antiquity, ancient,

Researching Zermatt, logistics for a town without cars presented challenges for this auto dependent photographer. A mountain with a reputation of rarely appearing from above its cool blanket of clouds presented other problems.

I am at that awkward stage of aging where I sometimes forget about it, usually while in pursuit of an elusive photo with a rapid expiration date.

A gem among Italy’s embarrassment of riches of Mediterranean splendor can be found a half hour south of the glitzy playground of the rich, Portofino Italy, here you will find the five towns of Cinque Terre, on the cliffs above the Ligurian Sea.

Everything there is to say about Venice has already been said; well maybe I can dig deep for something to contribute, as all that has been said, hasn’t been said by me.

I got hired to speak about photography in Yokosuka Japan, and whenever one of these speaking engagements happens in foreign place I like to spend a little extra time there to throw a new twist into my portfolio.

Many years ago I had experienced a premature midlife crisis and acted on it. I dropped everything I was doing and packed up my Swiss cheese business plan for shooting and selling landscape, lifestyle, and wildlife photography, and moved to Jackson Hole Wyoming. Five years later I was questioning my decision.

For obvious reasons, today the main source of revenue for Cinque Terre is tourism. A testimony to the strength of centuries-old tradition, fishing, wine and olive oil production continue. Adding to its charm is the lack of visible corporate development.

Because of their embarrassment of natural riches, the Dolomites became a World Heritage Site in 2009. The Dolomites have always had a huge imprint on those who admired them for the first time, and it is not a secret that they are acclaimed by many as the most beautiful mountains on earth.

After a two hour crash, I awoke in a panic knowing afternoon light of this exotic local was slipping by uncaptured. I retrieved my Fiat from the parking garage malaise and headed west into the marvelous antiquity that surrounded me.

I use Aperture by Apple to color correct all my images and to organize them as well. Aperture is a great database program that can help you put your files where you want them and help you find them, when you need them.

This book is for all visitors with a desire to seek out wildlife, photograph the landscape, or merely learn about the history, geology, and lay of the land of Grand Teton National Park.

Out of a chasm between Mt. Teewinot and Mt. St. John once flowed a large glacier that ceased to exist after the Pinedale Glaciation during the last years of the Pleistocene epoch, which ended about 11,700 years ago. Upon the demise of the glacier its legacy is Jenny Lake and upstream to Cascade Canyon.

Dana was scared of grizzlies and voiced her concerns, I quickly allayed her trepidation and she was game to follow.

I cast a fly upon the waters of the South Fork and in no time at all had a writhing, two-pound rainbow tail dancing across an eddy as the fish tried for the fast water a short distance away. Ah, ha! I had heard the South Fork was a better fishery than the upper Snake, but had never bothered to try it. Now I was hooked.

While living in Lake Tahoe in August 1986, I read in Outdoor Photographer Magazine a feature about Fred Joy and his gallery. As with all featured artists Outdoor Photographer profiled the highlights of Fred’s portfolio and Fred’s stunning imagery of the Grand Tetons spilled out all over several pages

Whenever I surprise a mule deer doe or fawn, and alarmingly their heads pop out of the forage like a jack-in-the-box, appearing as though they just got out of the beauty parlor, their oversized, ever alert, ears reaching for the sky, their eyes wide and big as saucers they always demonstrate why “doe-eyed” has become a cliché for beautiful, innocent eyes.

I momentarily gave pause to think of what a bad dad I was for suspending common to endeavor a nonessential photo excursion when the weatherman and the Department of Transportation, both were telling everyone to stay home. I really had no time to fret over it much, or the roads would close, and my long weekend would be spent at home.

Yep, we’ve all been there “Post Processing Hell”. We get home from a great day of photography, never has trip into the field ever been so good. Then it’s over, into the cave we go.

Luck favors the prepared mind, as does serendipity. Webster’s definition-Serendipity – an apparent aptitude for making fortunate discoveries accidentally. Audacious, is the photographer who chooses to make his living stalking serendipity from one location to another then back again hoping to capture light as it has never been captured before or tougher yet as they may have captured it in the past.

In the mountains of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem of northwest Wyoming there is a special valley resplendent with alpine amenities, wide-open spaces, vast forest wilderness, surrounded by towering peaks, and populated with more creatures than you can imagine.

Access to Yellowstone in winter is the problem, it has become illegal to take a private snowmobile into Yellowstone and very few of us have snow coaches of our own or are capable of marathon ski expeditions to access Yellowstone’s winter wonders, but it is not as inaccessible as many think.